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Mormon Organization

Mormon Church Organization

For additional information on all the topics below please visit the Mormon Wiki page.

General ConferenceGeneral Conference is a large meeting held by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (casually known as the Mormon Church). Conference is held twice annually, on the weekend of the first Sundays in April and in October. The April meeting includes annual statistical and financial reports not included in the October meeting. The conferences are identified (Read more).

Home Teaching

Mormon General ConferenceThe Home Teaching program is a program set up within the Mormon Church. Those who participate are referred to as home teachers. Throughout the Church, the program is designed to have two Priesthood holders visit 2-4 families in their ward. They are asked to visit the families on at least a monthly basis and share a message with them from the Church leaders. It is also their responsibility (Read more).

Melchizedek Priesthood

The Melchizedek Priesthood is one of the “orders” of priesthood in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church). It is referred to as the “high priesthood of the holy order of God” (Alma 4:20, 13:8) or simply as the “high priesthood.”  This priesthood was restored to the Prophet Joseph Smith and Oliver Cowdery in the spring of 1829 at the hands (Read more).

Mormon Bishops

Bishops of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also referred to as the Mormon Church) are the ward (local congregation) leaders. The leaders of the Church, including bishops, comprise a lay ministry. This means that they volunteer their services and are not paid for them. A bishop has many responsibilities. He is often referred to as the “father of the ward” (Read more).

Mormon Callings

Service in the Mormon Church is voluntary. Positions of service are known as callings, because they are “called” through revelation.

Essentially, the idea is that the Lord has called, or asked, a person to perform a specific duty in the Church. For a calling to be seen as legitimate, it must be given by a person that has the authority to give it. For example, on the ward level, (Read more).

Mormon Church Leadership

Doctrine of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as the Mormon Church) teaches that Christ is the head of the Church and that He makes His will known through revelation to the leaders of the Church. Since the organization of the Church in the latter-days, there has always been a designated presiding authority over the Church (Read more).

Mormon Church Presidents

Brief biographies of the sixteen men who have been Presidents of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Read more).

Mormon Prophets

The LDS Guide to the Scriptures states that a prophet is “a person who has been called by and speaks for God. As a messenger of God, a prophet receives commandments, prophecies, and revelations from God. His responsibility is to make known God’s will and true character to mankind and to show the meaning of his dealings with them. A prophet denounces sin and foretells (Read more).

Mormon Wards

A ward is a designated Mormon congregation. Typically, wards are made up of between 300-800 members who live within a specific area. Wards are determined by where a person lives, and members are encouraged to attend the ward to which they are assigned. All wards are designed to work in the same way, though singles wards are set up somewhat differently (Read more).

Mormon Women and the Priesthood

There has always been a question in the world of how women fit into the Mormon Church. Worthy Mormon men are given the priesthood, but what are the women given? The world seems to look upon Mormon women as not equivalent to the men. Nothing is further from the truth, and there are countless examples and counsel given to the men and women of the church through the apostles and prophets. (Read more).

Offices in the Aaronic Priesthood

In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church), the Aaronic Priesthood authority includes the ministering of angels and the preparatory gospel, which means the gospel of repentance, baptism, and the remission of sins, and the administering of outward or temporal ordinances (Read more).

Offices in the Melchizedek Priesthood

In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon Church), the Melchizedek Priesthood holds the authority over spiritual ordinances and blessings as well as the rights of presidency and the governance of the Church. (Read more).

Quorum of the Twelve Apostles

In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (casually known as the Mormon Church), twelve apostles are called by God to help the First Presidency lead the Church and be special witnesses of Jesus Christ to the world.  Together they form the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles.  These men have the Melchizedek Priesthood. This priesthood was given to Joseph Smith (Read more).

Relief Society: History and Purpose

In the early 1840s, the Mormons were building a beautiful city in Nauvoo, and, while most had what they needed, there were many that were poor and suffering. Most of the Saints gave freely of their substance to help those in need, but there was no organization and sometimes the needs of others were not known. (Read more).

Visiting Teaching

The Visiting Teaching program is a program set up within the Relief Society of the Mormon Church. Those who participate are referred to as visiting teachers. Throughout the Church, the program is set up so that two female members are assigned to women within the ward.  They are asked to visit the women on at least (Read more).

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This website is not owned by or affiliated with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (sometimes called the Mormon or LDS Church). The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. The views expressed by individual users are the responsibility of those users and do not necessarily represent the position of the Church. For the official Church websites, please visit LDS.org or Mormon.org.

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